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20100909
20100909
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
political settlement. what makes us think that we can make some progress now? that is really only very recently that all the necessary elements of the campaign have come together. despite the fact that there have been western forces there since 2001, it is only rarely now that the necessary number of forces are deployed in afghanistan, as general petraeus has recently been making clear. one of our announcements had been a 40% increase in the development going to afghanistan. we have an economic protests that that is bought out by the afghans themselves. all these things have come together in recent times. the single most difficult problem we have faced in international affairs, but i think now we have the finest military minds, a good military plan, the necessary quantities of development and the experience of provincial reconstruction, and motivated key ministers in afghanistan, to have the best chance for success that it is possible to put together. i believe is right to maintain an effort to succeed, because i think the consequences of abandoning that effort now would be extremely s
export. obviously we import a lot more than we export. well, the u.s. trade deficit dropped sharply last month. again, unexpectedly. due largely to the fact that we are exporting record numbers of goods and i'll tell you about that in a second. these are two very, very important parts of our economy which indicate, well, maybe things aren't all that bad. maybe people aren't, things aren't as bad as some people will have you believe. >>> now i want to tell you about four bright spots in the economy right now. one of them, i said we're exporting a lot. one of the things we're exporting a lot of are farming products. things that we farm here in america. and largely that's because there are developing economies like brazil and china, who are buying more of what we export. in fact, china is set now to become the second-biggest buyer of things that produced on american farms. the biggest buyer, he for your information, is canada. number two, mergers and acquisitions, we've been talking about this. you may have heard about it. we don't talk about it all the that much on cnn. but companies are b
. >> there was a column this week called, "a superpower super broke," talking about the u.s. it is estimated that there are about two hundred al-qaeda agents. >> how many? >> 200-300. >> i thought you said two hundred million-300 million. >> know, we are spending about $1 million apiece. this is the tip of the iceberg. this is a conceptual question. is there any thinking about approaches that are not so expensive that may be more affordable? >> let me turn your question a little bit on its head to say that this is actually the more affordable way of going in comparison to many of our other assistance programs, this is still not that large. compared to what we have to deal with in a country that is broken in the case of an iraq or en afghanistan, this is a very small amount. i would underscore, as the president and secretary have, that this is a matter for the international community. there are a lot of countries to have recognized this challenge and shown their commitment with their pocketbooks. it is a difficult time, obviously for us. you could argue that our british friends are on a very
's clear that many of us, an many in our audience are just coming off of summer vacation. yesterday at the state department, felt a little bit like the first day of school. everyone showed up for our morning meeting, and looking a lot healthier than they did when they left. and it is also obvious that there isn't any rest for any of us. the events of the past few weeks have kept us busy. we are working to support direct talks between the israelis and the palestinians, and nexteek, i will travel to egypt and jerusalem for the second round of these negotiations. in iraq, where our combat mission has ended, we are transferring and transitioning to an unprecedented civilian-led partnership. we are stepping up international pressure on iran to negotiate seriously on its nuclear program. we are working with pakistan as it recovers from devastating floods and continues to combat violent extremism an of course, the war in afghanistan is always at the top of our minds as well as our agenda. now, none of these challenges exist in ice lags. -- isolation. consider the middle east peace talks. a
with corporations, lobbyists, or anything. it has to do with us. last year i had a chance to go to iraq. i have been there three times and afghanistan twice. i met with a group of people they voted in iraq for the very first time. they stood in line risking their lives for the right to vote in the election. you know what? if the people of orange beach and gulf shores had to stand in the three-mile long bond to vote, it would not be 24%, it might not even before%. -- the 4%. no one controls your government when the american people take their government back. the best way to do that is to be active. i would give anything -- let's take this coming election, november 2, drive around the streets of orange beach. see how many people have a yard sign in their yard. have a bumper sticker on their car. wear a button to the grocery store. that with all due respect is the best way to keep america on the track we want it to go on. it is not just to say to limit this -- and i agree with you. we need to limit outside influence especially if it is not being reported. but the better ways to make sure that the peopl
-tongued rhetoric which dragged us into it. a lot of people thought it was a good idea and yet now conveniently within britain and many other countries it's blamed on this george bush and his cleverred-tonged mood until tony blair. think think he wants to say, no i was a bigger figure than that. >> rose: also from london, an old friend of this program, john burns now the london bureau chief of the "new york times". >> we were perhaps transfixed by the relief would come to iraq with the overthrowing of saddam and yes maybe we should have spent more time difficult as it would have been under saddam to look at the trauma, the psychological trauma inflicted on iraq by the ba'ath party and saddam over a period of 30 years. all of that it can accept. if i had to do it over again i would have looked at that because it was the fractured pitch thatter that society in part along with saddam terror overground as government going underground as an insurgency that made the american venture in iraq next to impossible to achieve. >> couric: from london john and john when we come back. captioning sponsored by
is a former employee of a company that supplies translators to the u.s. saying most translators aren't doing their jobs? brian ross investigates. >> reporter: a u.s. army unit from the 173rd airborne, on patrol in afghanistan, trying to track the source of a taliban rocket attack. the mission will end in a complete failure to communicate because of one member of the team. its translator, the man on the right. a british journalist caught it all on tape. 2008, as the patrol sergeant adams uses his translator, who asks a village elder about the taliban. >> all right. asked him how it's been here. >> reporter: but the translator tells the sergeant the exact opposite thing. >> we are fine, we have no problems here. >> reporter: sergeant genevieve chase says there are plenty of good translators, but still, too many bad ones. >> people who claim to speak the language don't, and when things get a little bit complicated, they're not able to communicate effectively with the locals and get the information that we need. >> reporter: most of the army's afghan translators
they'd show her how to use it once or twice. that man stayed for hours! whatever it takes, as long as it takes. that's our guarantee. why do we go to < uch great lengths? because making you mobile is our mission. we'llwork wit your doctor. we'll work with medicare and lçur private insurance. we'll even service your scooter anywhere in the country. call the sco÷"er store today. >>> tropical storm hermine has left its mark on texas after making landfall. flood overran parts of dallas with water featuring five feet in areas. >> small tornados were spotted leaving at least one person injured. here now is "american landscape" coverage from wfaa in dallas. >> reporter: a tornado on the ground in downtown dallas. warning sirens. a sight not seen in years. >> whoa, there we go, transformer fire right there. >> reporter: we watched as multiple funnel clouds touched down in north texas. >> i heard that train sound. it's a roar. and i was running, hoping that it wouldn't catch me and pick me up. >> reporter: but before the storm, and before the twisters -- >> up to here, to my knees, i gues
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)